Review: ‘Sing Me Your Scars’ by Damien Angelica Walters

ScarsSing Me Your Scars by Damien Angelica Walters
Apex Publications (March 9, 2015)

Sing Me Your Scars is a gripping collection of short stories that provides a number of deeply-felt chills without relying on the crutches of common horror clichés and tropes.

In this mix of new and previously published fiction, Damien Angelica Walters focuses less on the boogeymen in the shadows and more on inner demons like doubt, insecurity, and dependance. Don’t get me wrong – this is no mundane collection of inner monologues; we’ve got a snake-headed woman you might recognize from Mythology 101, and a robot model of Henry VIII that lives with a stripper, and women who can sing buildings into existence, and many more such wondrous creations. But every single story,
now matter how outlandish the window dressing may seem, is grounded in the
very real foibles and frailties of human existence.

There are a number of standouts in Sing Me Your Scars. Among them is the title story, a fresh take on the Frankenstein story in which each “contributor” maintains a voice in the increasingly crowded headspace of Victoria, the mad doctor’s tragic creation. “Melancholia” is another strong entry; in it, a woman watches her mother slowly unravel due to Alzheimer’s, tragically unable to see the very real magic her mother is leaving behind. “Scarred” sees a woman with those fabled voices in her head, urging her to cause pain to people around here; when she cuts herself, her hate is manifested as a dangerous, physical thing, but she only uses it on those who deserve…at least, those who the voices say deserve it.

Walters is not afraid to play around with established storytelling techniques, but throughout her experimentation she never loses control of the story itself. There’s nothing here that can be reduced to pure gimmickry – when she does try something out of the ordinary, it’s with a very real and specific purpose.

Sing Me Your Scars is the third entry in Apex’s “Voices” series, their attempt to spotlight new and exciting storytellers. As with the previous entries (Douglas F. Warrick and Maurice Broaddus), Apex proves they have a great eye (and ear) for talent. Walters is a writer that seems prepared to be around for the long haul, and horror fiction as a whole is likely to benefit greatly from her talents.

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Review: ‘The Lost Level’ by Brian Keene

The Lost Level by Brian Keene
Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000037_00020]Apex Publications (January 19, 2015)

Brian Keene, writer of many interconnected novels, creator of vast mythologies, seems to have found the series he was born to write.

The Lost Level, the first in what I hope will be many tales of inter-dimensional castaway Aaron Pace (and, apparently, I’m going to get my wish), is a love letter to pulp adventurists like Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E. Howard. Pace is a dabbler in magic and the occult, and his studies lead him to a method to open doors to other dimensions. As his confidence increases, his exploration of these other dimensions becomes more frequent, until one day he steps through a door that vanishes behind him. Stranded in a strange land with no way to get home, Pace has no choice but to journey onward, trying to learn about this new place, and to discover his own place in it.

When we first meet Pace he’s already been in the “Lost Level” – a place he’d heard whispers of before finding it firsthand – for some time. He’s writing his adventures down, and the tale he tells here is of his first frightening days roaming the land. There’s a lot to tell: his first encounters with bands of dangerous humanoid lizards; his partnering up with the beautiful Kasheena and the fierce, intelligent Bloop; and crossing paths with deadly vegetation, slugs, robots, dinosaurs and more.

If it sounds like Pace’s new home is a crazy-quilt mashup of comic book creatures and pulp novel landscapes, well, that’s because it is. This “Lost Level,” as Pace comes to understand it, is a place where things from all the other dimensions wash up like so much garbage on a beach. For its inhabitants, its a hostile and inescapable trap. For Keene, however, The Lost Level is a rich playground in which childlike fantasies can be brought to life with the skill and precision of a talented artist.

Keene is one of the hardest working writers in the business, and he often comes across in blog posts and in social media as a guy carrying the weight of the world on his shoulders. That’s why it’s so great to behold the sense of pure wonder and playfulness and just plain fun that flows through this book. It’s like peeking in a kid’s bedroom while he sits on the floor weaving elaborate stories that involve every toy in his toybox. You know he’s having a damn good time, and you’re right there enjoying it with him.

As a bonus, The Lost Level ties heavily into Keene’s over-arching mythos, The Labyrinth; as such, long-time readers of his work are going to be delighted at the amount of stuff from his other stories that bleeds over into this book. It’s done in such a way that casual readers won’t be lost, so if you haven’t read the Clickers series or Dead Sea or any of his other stuff, worry not. If you’ve read those books, and more, well – there’s plenty for you to look forward to.

The Lost Level perfectly straddles that fine line that separates an “anything goes” mentality from sheer overindulgence. It’s a book chock full of pulp references and great set pieces, but it never strays too far from the characters at its heart. This is far and away my favorite thing that Keene has written thus far, and I can’t wait to see where he takes the story from here.